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Skincare Diet: 5 Must-Avoid Skin-Damaging Foods

April 21, 2021

fast food like burgers, pizza, fries, and chips are bad for skincare

Is nutrition the best skincare for aging skin? In a nutshell, yes!

It is easy to forget that skin is an organ. Often, we see it as an aesthetic feature rather than a vital part of our anatomy. However, just like any other organ, the skin needs nutrients to function properly.

The condition of our skin can also reflect the health of our internal organs. For instance, skin conditions like eczema and melasma are correlated with our gut health.

In this article, we will talk about five must-avoid foods that cause poor skin aging.

Refined Carbohydrates

Refined carbohydrates are foods that are made by removing nutrients and fiber from whole foods. These carbs also contain additives, such as sugar, artificial sweeteners, and salt.

According to several studies, refined carbohydrates are one of the primary foods that cause acne.

Our bodies absorb refined carbohydrates faster than necessary. Most importantly, these carbs have a high glycemic index. High G.I. foods contribute to inflammation, which causes skin issues like rashes and breakouts. Also, unstable blood sugar levels lead to hormonal imbalance, another critical factor in acne breakouts.

Dairy

Milk is another type of food that causes acne. According to data from the American Academy of Dermatology Association, acne was common in individuals of 9 to 15 years old who drank skim milk. In another case study, individuals of 10 to 24 years old who didn’t have acne drank less milk than those who had acne.

There’s no sufficient data to confirm that other dairy products, such as cheese and yogurt, contribute to acne breakouts.

Red Meat

Red meat is one of the main foods that cause inflammation. Particularly, red meat intake contributes to gut inflammation. Unfortunately, gut inflammation contributes to skin disorders like dermatitis herpetiformis, rosacea, acne, eczema, and psoriasis.

Red meat provides us with nutrients like Vitamin B12 and iron. However, you can get the nutrients of red meat from foods like:

  • Fish
  • Eggs
  • Plant-based foods
  • Poultry

Caffeine

Caffeine intake can impact the hormonal balance by stimulating the brain to release stress hormones. Furthermore, stress hormones can impact our blood sugar levels and insulin.

As we previously mentioned, an imbalance in hormones and increased blood sugar levels can cause skin disorders like acne and skin irritation.

For most people, caffeine provides anti-inflammatory benefits. However, for other people, caffeine triggers inflammation, which causes skin disorders. The different responses to caffeine depend on genetics. If you are currently experiencing skin problems, we recommend decreasing your caffeine consumption and see whether your skin health improves.

Foods With Gluten

By now, you have probably already heard of the health benefits of gluten-free diets.

Primarily, a gluten-free diet is highly beneficial for those with celiac disease. Unfortunately, celiac disease is hard to diagnose, and many people are likely to be unaware they have it.

What is the link between celiac disease and skin health?

A common symptom of celiac disease is dermatitis herpetiformis, a skin disorder that causes skin rashes and irritation.

Another similar but less severe condition to celiac disease is non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

People experience similar celiac disease symptoms with this condition but have no intestinal damage when consuming gluten.

We encourage you to visit your doctor if you believe a gluten allergy may be the cause behind your skin issues.

At Z.E.N. Foods, we provide meal plans that can help you get healthy skin and age better. For your convenience, all meals are delivered to your door each day. To learn more about our meal plans, please call us at (310) 205–9368. We are here to help!

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